I FOUND ¨ I LIKED

These are things I find and like.

nevver:

How to bend light, Mona Kuhn

(Source: monakuhn.com)

type-lover:

Mystery Chocolate
by Kevin Harald Campean

(via fortheloveoftype)

(Source: vintagegal, via crashburnlove)

supersonicart:

Cristina Camacho.

Cut canvas, painting sculptures by Cristina Camacho:

Read More

TRUE.

[El arte contemporáneo] también es un fraude porque está sostenido nada más que en el mercado, que es fluctuante y artificial en la mayoría de los casos. Se otorgan a las obras valores artificiales para que pienses: ‘si cuesta 90.000 euros es porque debe ser arte’. Estos precios son una burbuja, como existió la burbuja inmobiliaria.

—   La boca de Avelina Lesper se llenó de verdad.  (via rabmessina)

(Source: lavanguardia.com, via rabmessina)

humansofnewyork:


"Facebook is telling me that everyone has a house, a kid, and a dog. So I’m just trying to calm the fuck down."

humansofnewyork:

"Facebook is telling me that everyone has a house, a kid, and a dog. So I’m just trying to calm the fuck down."

maartendeckers:

Be happy. It drives people crazy. Design by Wordboner

maartendeckers:

Be happy. It drives people crazy. Design by Wordboner

(Source: wrdbnr.com)

 

 

Van Gogh Shadow - The artist’s paintings brought to life

The Jacket - Inside CHANEL

Chapter 4: Discover the new film “The Jacket,” now playing on Inside CHANEL.

nevver:

Jill Magid

the beauty of nature: a rainbow of blooming flowers (timelapse)

(Source: stardusted, via crashburnlove)

Preach it sister.


When patients were committed to the Willard Asylum for the Insane in Upstate New York, they arrived with a suitcase packed with all of the possessions they thought they needed for their time inside.
Most never left. The mental hospital had an average stay of nearly 30 years. When patients died, they were buried in nameless graves across the street of the asylum. Their suitcases, with all their worldly possessions, were locked in an attic and forgotten.
In 1995, an employee of the mental hospital discovered the suitcases, 400 of them. They date from 1910 to 1960.
Now, photographer Jon Crispin is cataloging each suitcase and opening a window into the lives - and the minds - of the people deemed too unwell to be allowed in society.

Go here for more information and to sign up for notification on further development of the project

Woa.

(Source: regibean, via notmodernart)